These are the books that Princeton, Harvard and Yale professors recommend we should read

BE2C2 Report — Professors at America’s most prestigious colleges — those in the top 10, according to US News & World Report when asked, shared with Business Insider the single book they think every student should read in 2017.

The topics of the books spanned issues from politics to social science to Shakespearean literature, and drones.

These professors from schools like Princeton, Harvard, and Yale (Ivy League schools) think you should read the following books or at least few of them this year.

— Abramson, a former executive editor of The New York Times and current Harvard English lecturer, recommends students read Richard Hofstadter’s “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” first published in 1964.

Abramson says the book is “everything you need to know about the root of Donald Trump’s rhetoric and fake news.”

— Eric Maskin is a Harvard professor and received the 2007 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics. Maurice Schweitzer is a professor of operations, information, and decisions at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

Both chose Michael Lewis’ “The Undoing Project.” The book is based on a series of breathtakingly original studies undoing our assumptions about the decision-making process. The papers showed the ways in which the human mind erred, systematically, when forced to make judgments in uncertain situations. Their work created the field of behavioral economics, revolutionized Big Data studies, advanced evidence-based medicine, and led to a new approach to government regulation

— David B. Carter is a politics professor at Princeton University. He recommended “The Strategy of Conflict,” by Thomas Schelling, especially given the author’s recent death. He said:

“‘The Strategy of Conflict’ is both probably the best book ever written about conflict and still very useful and important for understanding strategic interaction among states (and individuals).

“It also happens to be a very well-written and readable book. I read it as a junior in college and it was instrumental in getting me interested in international relations more generally, and in understanding conflict behavior and strategy in particular. I know it is an old book, but think it is something that anyone would benefit from reading.”

— Harold Bloom, an American literary critic and Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale, kept it short and sweet saying students should read, “all of Shakespeare.”

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